Organza vs Tulle: The Difference Explained

In this post, we'll cover the best uses of each type of fabric, as well as their advantages and drawbacks.
Last updatedLast updated: October 10, 2021
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Sheer fabrics are some of the most beautiful fabrics on the planet. No wonder that they form an important part of a wedding veil. These fabrics find other uses as well and are quite versatile. Many readers wonder what the differences are between the different types on the market. It is understandable as most of the materials look so alike. Tulle and organza are two types of this fabric. What is the difference between them? In this organza vs tulle comparison, we will show you the differences.

While there are similarities, we will show you how to tell them apart. We will take a close look at each of these materials and their special properties. We also will look at the best occasions to wear each one and see whether one is better than the other.

What is organza?

Organza vs Tulle: The Difference Explained

This fabric is a lightweight, plain weave material. It features a crisp hand and has some of the best drapes in this category. It is versatile and is used by tailors to make different stuff including skirts and dresses.

Despite being lightweight and plain weave, it is a strong fabric that will last for quite some time. The material itself is normally made from silk. However, you can find some types made of cotton. The cotton variety is organdy and is very similar to organza.

With improvements in technology, you can find different types of this fabric, with some coming as natural while others are synthetic. You can use a machine to sew this fabric.

Characteristics

It is of Eastern origin and was brought to the West centuries ago. Ever since it made an appearance on the scene, it has been regarded as one staple of fashion. In its heyday, this material was combined with silk fibers and very expensive. Thus, only very rich people and the nobility could afford it.

In those early years, this material was quite expensive and it was very rare to sew a whole dress from it. Instead, it served as a way to decorate. Over time, though, weavers learned to use the material and make it with viscose and synthetic fibers. This innovation resulted in a lower price and made it more accessible to the common people.

Some of the characteristics of this material can be summed up below. It is:

  • Smooth
  • Wiry
  • Crisp
  • Slippery
  • Sheer


One downside of the material is that it creases. When that happens though, the good thing is that steaming or ironing can restore its former appearance.

How can you use it?

This material is a staple in formal wear. Here are some of its most popular uses.

  • Evening wear

Organza is excellent as evening wear. It is usually layered over other fabrics like silk or satin. As it is a transparent material, it is also useful for creating sculptured dimensions.

  • Bridal Gown

This material is popular in bridal wear. It is used in wedding gowns and bridesmaid dresses. It sculptures the body well and the shiny, smooth material accentuates the figure of the wearer. And, of course, this material is used for veils.

  • Home Décor

This versatile material is also used in decorating the home as it can be used for curtains, table runners, seating, and even wedding decorations.

  • Bags

Another interesting way that this fabric is used is in pouches for accessories and making other small bags.

A computerized sewing machine will certainly come in handy in creating all of these.

The MDS pack of Organza fabric is one of the options that many reviews indicate as one of the best options.

What is tulle?

Organza vs Tulle: The Difference Explained

Tulle is another material that looks similar to organza.

It is named for its city of origin. Tulle first appeared in the city of Tulle, France. At its creation, it became one of the materials used for weddings. However, its biggest appearance was in 1840 when Queen Victoria used it to make her bridal gown.

Tulle comes with impressive elasticity and has good draping powers. It is also a versatile option as you can find it soft or very stiff depending on the blend or the materials used in the composition.

different types of tulle, each with its specific appearance and effects it gives.

Tulle illusion

This type of tulle is very light and transparent. It captures light magnificently, which can give it a type of glow. No wonder that it is used as a second skin. It is used in necklines and cutouts in clothes.

French tulle

This type of tulle is designed to add volume to the cloth. It can be used as layers, but will not lose transparency or being lightweight. It is also really soft and light. Most times, it is used for wedding veils.

American tulle

This is also known as the English tulle and it is very similar to the first type of tulle we discussed. The major difference between this tulle and illusion tulle is that this type offers more resistance. Therefore, it can be embroidered.

Micro tulle

This type of tulle is used in making women’s clothing and stuff like mosquito nets.

Silt tulle

It is arguably the best type of tulle. It is a major part of bridal wear.

Many reviews say that Craft and Party have some of the best Tulle fabric you can buy. You can get that and enjoy sewing with your machine to make dresses and other wears.

How can you use it?

Organza vs Tulle: The Difference Explained

This is a very versatile type of fabric. It can be used for many purposes.

  • Wedding gowns and veils

This is one of the most popular ways this fabric is used.

  • Evening gowns

This is another way to use the material. You might use it for the whole gown or just make some part of it with the material. It is also used for sleeves and bodices.

  • Tutus and dance costumes

The lightness and comfort of this material make it a good choice for making costumes and clothes for dancers.

Other uses include crafting, linings, floral arrangements, and petticoats.

Organza vs tulle: Quick comparison

  Organza Tulle
Texture Stiff Light
Appearance Transparent Transparent
Sheen Yes No
Drape Stiff Stiff
Stability Creases Crease-resistant

Clothes

You can use both materials for clothes. They are both good for wedding attire and evening gowns.

Decorating

Both fabrics can be used in decorating. Tulle, for example, is found in all colors so you can use it for your décor.

Organza s also used in decorating. It is useful for floral arrangements, pew bows, window dressings, and more. And its availability in different colors is an added advantage.

Final thoughts

Organza vs Tulle: The Difference Explained

Organza and Tulle are two excellent and similar materials. They are plain weave fabrics that have their lengthwise and width-wise threads woven together. Due to the way they are made and their original components, they are both lightweight. Unlike other materials, the quality of these fabrics is measured in the number of holes per inch.

If you want poof in your dress, then Tulle is the option for you. It offers sheer and looks positively ethereal. The only possible downside is that it might scratch you. On the other hand, Organza is a pretty chill, crisp fabric. It is used in veils as well, but more people opt to use it for accessories and overlays. As a natural fiber, it is a good option, the only thing that might be a con is the stiff body.

We hope this organza vs tulle comparison helps you to buy the right material for your requirements.

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